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There are three temperature scales in use today, Fahrenheit, Celsius and Kelvin.

Fahrenheit (F) temperature scale is a scale based on 32 for the freezing point of water and 212 for the boiling point of water, the interval between the two being divided into 180 parts; the 18th-century German physicist D. G. FAHRENHEIT originally took as the zero of his scale the temperature of an equal ice-salt mixture and selected the values of 30 and 90 for the freezing point of water and normal body temperature, respectively; these later were revised to 32 and 96, but the final scale required an adjustment to 98.6 for the latter value;

until the 1970s the Fahrenheit temperature scale was in general common use in English-speaking countries; the Celsius, or centigrade, scale was employed in most other countries and for scientific purposes worldwide; since that time, however, most English-speaking countries have officially adopted the Celsius scale; the conversion formula for a temperature that is expressed on the Celsius (C) scale to its Fahrenheit (F) representation is: F = 9/5C + 32;

Celsius (C) temperature scale also called centigrade temperature scale, is the scale based on 0 for the freezing point of water and 100 for the boiling point of water; invented in 1742 by the Swedish astronomer A. CELSIUS, it is sometimes called the centigrade scale because of the 100-degree interval between the defined points; the following formula can be used to convert a temperature from its representation on the Fahrenheit ( F) scale to the Celsius (C) value: C = 5/9(F - 32); the Celsius scale is in general use wherever metric units have become accepted, and it is used in scientific work everywhere;

Kelvin (K) temperature scale is the base unit of thermodynamic temperature measurement in the International System (SI) of measurement; it is defined as 1/273.16 of the triple point (equilibrium among the solid, liquid, and gaseous phases) of pure water; the kelvin (symbol K without the degree sign) is also the fundamental unit of the Kelvin scale, an absolute temperature scale named for the British physicist W. Thomson, Baron KELVIN;
 

Measures of capacity - Cubic measure - Avoirdupois weights - Length measure - Square measures - SI units - Prefixes - Temperatures

  CONVERSION OF TEMPERATURES

C °

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1 0

1 1

1 2

1 3

1 4

1 5

1 6

1 7

1 8

1 9

2 0

2 1

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

3 2

33

34

35

36

3 7

38

3 2. 0

3 3. 8

3 5. 6

3 7. 4

3 9. 2

4 1. 0

4 2. 8

4 4. 6

4 6. 4

4 8. 2

5 0. 0

5 1. 8

5 3. 6

5 5. 4

5 7. 2

5 9. 0

6 0. 8

6 2. 6

6 4. 4

6 6. 2

6 8. 0

6 9. 8

71 .6

73 .4

75 .2

77 .0

78 .8

80 .6

82 .4

84 .2

86 .0

87 .8

6 9. 6

91 .4

93 .2

95 .0

96 .8

9 8. 6

10 0. 4

K °

2 7 3. 1 5

2 7 4. 1 5

2 7 5. 1 5

2 7 6. 1 5

2 7 7. 1 5

2 7 8. 1 5

2 7 9. 1 5

2 8 0. 1 5

2 8 1. 1 5

2 8 2. 1 5

2 8 3. 1 5

2 8 4. 1 5

2 8 5. 1 5

2 8 6. 1 5

2 8 7. 1 5

2 8 8. 1 5

2 8 9. 1 5

2 9 0. 1 5

2 9 1. 1 5

2 9 2. 1 5

2 9 3. 1 5

2 9 4. 1 5

29 5. 15

29 6. 15

29 7. 15

29 8. 15

29 9. 15

30 0. 15

30 1. 15

30 2. 15

30 3. 15

30 4. 15

3 0 5. 1 5

30 6. 15

30 7. 15

30 8. 15

30 9. 15

3 1 0. 1 5

31 1. 15

© by R. Schlegel 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

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